April132012
April112012

You want to say Hi to the cute girl on the subway. How will she react? Fortunately, I can tell you with some certainty, because she’s already sending messages to you. Looking out the window, reading a book, working on a computer, arms folded across chest, body away from you = do not disturb. So, y’know, don’t disturb her. Really. Even to say that you like her hair, shoes, or book. A compliment is not always a reason for women to smile and say thank you. You are a threat, remember? You are Schrödinger’s Rapist. Don’t assume that whatever you have to say will win her over with charm or flattery. Believe what she’s signaling, and back off.

[…]

So if you speak to a woman who is otherwise occupied, you’re sending a subtle message. It is that your desire to interact trumps her right to be left alone. If you pursue a conversation when she’s tried to cut it off, you send a message. It is that your desire to speak trumps her right to be left alone. And each of those messages indicates that you believe your desires are a legitimate reason to override her rights.

Phaedra Starling’s Schrödinger’s Rapist: or a guy’s guide to approaching strange women without being maced (via airportlife)

(Source: lostgrrrls, via absurdical)

April92012
newwavewomen:

Ashley Judd, on The Daily Beast: 
Patriarchy is not men. Patriarchy is a system in which both women and men participate. It privileges, inter alia, the interests of boys and men over the bodily integrity, autonomy, and dignity of girls and women. It is subtle, insidious, and never more dangerous than when women passionately deny that they themselves are engaging in it. This abnormal obsession with women’s faces and bodies has become so normal that we (I include myself at times—I absolutely fall for it still) have internalized patriarchy almost seamlessly. We are unable at times to identify ourselves as our own denigrating abusers, or as abusing other girls and women.

newwavewomen:

Ashley Judd, on The Daily Beast

Patriarchy is not men. Patriarchy is a system in which both women and men participate. It privileges, inter alia, the interests of boys and men over the bodily integrity, autonomy, and dignity of girls and women. It is subtle, insidious, and never more dangerous than when women passionately deny that they themselves are engaging in it. This abnormal obsession with women’s faces and bodies has become so normal that we (I include myself at times—I absolutely fall for it still) have internalized patriarchy almost seamlessly. We are unable at times to identify ourselves as our own denigrating abusers, or as abusing other girls and women.

(Source: rookiemag, via citysleep)

March142012
“A popular exercise among High School creative writing teachers in America is to ask students to imagine they have been transformed, for a day, into someone of the opposite sex, and describe what that day might be like. The results, apparently, are uncannily uniform. The girls all write long and detailed essays that clearly show they have spent a great deal of time thinking about the subject. Half of the boys usually refuse to write the essay entirely. Those who do make it clear they have not the slightest conception what being a teenage girl might be like, and deeply resent having to think about it.”

David Graeber, “Beyond Power/Knowledge: An Exploration of Power, Ignorance and Stupidity” (pdf)

He also says much the same thing in “Revolutions in Reverse,” an essay included in the book Revolutions in Reverse (which can be read in Scribd at the link). I’d been meaning to post a quote from the second source for a while, thanks to Aaron Brady for the actual excerpt above. That last link is a good essay on the recent Rush Limbaugh BS and how patriarchy works and how male privilege is defended by having men like Limbaugh around to keep women’s opinions out of the allowed discourse on the subject. To keep high school boys forever unable to write essays that could relate to the issue of needing hormonal birth control to control ovarian cysts.

(via youthisastateofmind)

We talked about this a lot this year in English. Girls are taught from a young age that we have to connect to what we read, so when we do excercises in class, everyone talks about how they connect to Huck Finn, or to Jay Gatsby, or to Julius Caesar. We connect to all the characters because we have to, because if we don’t then we won’t survive through the years of school.

Boys don’t deal with this. Practically every book or story they encounter from the time they begin school is full of male characters and written by men. So when confronted with female characters of female authors, they don’t know what to do. They feel as if they can’t connect with these characters because of the gender boundaries. As one woman in my class pointed out, “girls have to connect to male characters, but boys don’t have to connect to female characters.” By the time they’re my age, it’s not even intentional: many honestly think that they won’t understand a female character because they have no shared experiences whatsoever.

(via animehrmine)

When my husband told me he found a lot to relate to in the character of Janie in “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” I just about fell over from shock. It was literally the first time I’d ever heard a dude say he could relate to a female character.  

(via whynotshesaid)

(via clobberona)

10PM
1AM

A group of cross-dressing women in 1910

A group of cross-dressing women in 1910

(Source: sangfroidwoolf, via commanderspook)

March132012
March122012

thegoddamazon:

cruelyouth:

pantslessprogressive:

Eight female state senators in Georgia walked out of the Senate chambers on Thursday to protest two bills that hinder access to abortion and contraceptives. All eight female democratic senators left the chambers together after two bills they oppose passed the Republican-led Senate. From Atlanta’s WXIA, the legislation:

  • Prohibits state employees from using state health benefits to pay for abortions
  • Does not allow employees of private religious institutions to demand that their insurance policies pay for contraceptives

“We stood together to protest what we feel is absolutely a war on women here in Georgia and we want to sound the alert to Georgians,” said Sen. Nan Orrick.

Republican state senator Joshua McKoon said of the legislation, “What I would say is the war that’s being waged is on a relative minority in this country that has strong beliefs that are protected by the First Amendment.”

The bills now heads to the House, whereboth are expected to pass.

The senators who walked out: Sen. Gloria ButlerSen. Gale Davenport, Sen. Nan Orrock, Sen. Freddie Powell SimsSen. Donzella James, Sen. Miriam Paris, Sen. Valencia Seay and Sen. Horacena Tate. Looks like I’ll be spending my Friday night emailing these senators to thank them for taking a stance on an incredibly important issue.

..did I reblog this already?  Well, doesn’t matter, I’m going to reblog it again…

Look at their faces. They’re furious. Also, why is “War on Women” displayed as a puzzled inquiry? It should go without saying that women are suddenly under attack.

(Source: pantslessprogressive, via clobberona)

March82012
bookh8r:

rawwwrrrr:

International Slutty Women’s Day: A Story in GIFs
Posted by Ann on Thu, 03/08/2012 - 03:28

The year was 2012. Women were basically just hanging out.
You know, doing lady stuff. 
We’d gotten used to the fact that, for decades, people have been trying to tell us what to do.
That we should pay attention to our ticking biological clocks, lest we become dried-up old spinsters. 
That we should/shouldn’t/should settle and marry a dude who sucks. 

That we’re a drag on society if we choose to have babies without marrying, but that abortion is objectively wrong (well, except in cases when some dudes say it isn’t), so we can’t choose if and when and how to have one. You know, for our own protection.

That we were asking for it.

This is just an unending onslaught of bullshit! It is so tired. I mean, how many times do we have to remind you to get your laws—and sometimes your actual hands—off our bodies?

And now, the latest: that we’re sluts if we use birth control?!

Let’s reiterate: Now we’re sluts if we don’t have abortions? Apparently this term applies to anyone with a
Wait, what?


This makes us want to hurl.

Or maybe just drink copious amounts of boxed wine.

But the thing is, we’re pretty used to fighting these battles. We see your side-eye when we buy Plan B.

We’ve driven our friends across state lines so they can get an abortion without your stupid 24-hour waiting period.

We’ve footed the bill for not only our own birth control pills, but for the backup box of condoms. Now you want to make it even harder to get contraception? We are over it. 

In case you haven’t noticed, you are old and increasingly politically irrelevant.

So please, COME AT US, BROS.

Let’s fight this one out.

Because women (and people who respect women’s autonomy) are a pretty signifiant portion of the population.

Seriously. And have a very happy International Women’s Day.



This is fucking epic

bookh8r:

rawwwrrrr:

International Slutty Women’s Day: A Story in GIFs

Posted by Ann on Thu, 03/08/2012 - 03:28

The year was 2012. Women were basically just hanging out.

You know, doing lady stuff.

We’d gotten used to the fact that, for decades, people have been trying to tell us what to do.

That we should pay attention to our ticking biological clocks, lest we become dried-up old spinsters.

That we should/shouldn’t/should settle and marry a dude who sucks. 

That we’re a drag on society if we choose to have babies without marrying, but that abortion is objectively wrong (well, except in cases when some dudes say it isn’t), so we can’t choose if and when and how to have one. You know, for our own protection.

That we were asking for it.

This is just an unending onslaught of bullshit! It is so tired. I mean, how many times do we have to remind you to get your laws—and sometimes your actual hands—off our bodies?

And now, the latest: that we’re sluts if we use birth control?!

Let’s reiterate: Now we’re sluts if we don’t have abortions? Apparently this term applies to anyone with a

Wait, what?

This makes us want to hurl.

Or maybe just drink copious amounts of boxed wine.

But the thing is, we’re pretty used to fighting these battles. We see your side-eye when we buy Plan B.

We’ve driven our friends across state lines so they can get an abortion without your stupid 24-hour waiting period.

We’ve footed the bill for not only our own birth control pills, but for the backup box of condoms. Now you want to make it even harder to get contraception? We are over it. 

In case you haven’t noticed, you are old and increasingly politically irrelevant.

So please, COME AT US, BROS.

Let’s fight this one out.

Because women (and people who respect women’s autonomy) are a pretty signifiant portion of the population.

Seriously. And have a very happy International Women’s Day.

This is fucking epic

(via clobberona)

February242012

**TRIGGER WARNING ABUSE, SUICIDE**

Every time I read an article about conservatives being “pro- life” I am reminded of my brother who died of ALS at the age of 47. He spent the last 6 years of his life in nursing homes where the care, supervision and meals were abysmal. One of his former roommates was smoking a cigarette, fell asleep and burned to death because his diaper caught fire. Another roommate went home for the weekend to visit his mother and committed suicide in the garage of her home so that he wouldn’t have to return to the nursing home. I have to say that in all the years my brother was there I never once saw a group of conservatives out in front of the building shouting slogans about the sanctity of life and how all lives - no matter what age - are meaningful. I never once saw a group of evangelicals visiting with patients, pushing wheelchairs, or feeding the elderly residents. There were no Rick Santorums advocating on behalf of my brother who several years before had been a pro golfer and was still the father of two adorable young boys. When conservatives and evangelicals understand that ALL life really is sacred, including that of the elderly, the permanently disabled, the terminally ill, and the women and children who accidentally get bombed in the course of a war, then maybe I’ll listen to their opinions on contraceptives and/or abortion. For now, however, this is really just a politically heated argument about women’s reproductive rights and who gets to control those rights.

The ‘Safe, Legal, Rare’ Illusion - NYTimes.com (via glitterencrustedbunghole)

(via clobberona)